Recent events in the Faculty of Arts

Recent events in the Faculty of Arts

Recent events in the Faculty of Arts

Making connections through hip hop, Security Studies students get first-hand industry insights, MRes students showcase their projects, and more.

Making connections through Hip Hop

The Department of Sociology ran a Hip Hop Workshop on 25 May which brought Macquarie Sex, Race, and Rock students together with Northern Arizona University's Dr Frederick Gooding Jr and his students, academics who work on hip hop as well as artists from the Australian hip hop scene. These local artists included 'grandfather' of Australian Indigenous hip hop Munkimuk, Jakob Ballard (Izzy), and Rhyan Clapham (Dobby).

Dr Frederick Gooding Jr teaches a class at Northern Arizona University called "The Genius of Hip Hop”. He is interested in the ways that hip hop moves and connects people in different parts of the world. He and his students spent a few days at Macquarie learning with students from the Department of Indigenous Studies.

Dr Rebecca Sheehan said the event “was living, breathing, evidence of the problems of racism alongside how much music matters, how transformative it is, and it was wonderful that we were able to give deserved space to hip hop within the university.”

Students heard about how hip hop can inspire a knowledge of self, and from local hip hop artists who talked about their practice and hip hop as a unique form for exploring and expressing experiences of racism. Hip hop was also explored as a global form that is used as a tool of protest and community. Some of the students also performed their own raps or spoken word poems.

Dr Sheehan said, "It was great seeing our students connecting with the visiting African American students – cross-cultural dialogue, person-to-person diplomacy."

"The event achieved a level of directness and intimacy because the conversations were personal and political: hip hop is a form that was invented by marginalised people who pulled it together out of the barest of resources and made what has become one of the most potent and profitable pop cultural forms in the world."

Security Studies students get first-hand industry insights

The Department of Security Studies and Criminology and the Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers have developed a joint program of public seminars to connect students with insights and networking opportunities with industry leaders.

Previous seminars explored the hacker mindset, and advances in crowdsourcing insights for intelligence analysis.The most recent event on 21 June featured Stuart Clarke, Global Lead for Investigations, Security and Intelligence at Nuix – a software company focusing on investigations, cybersecurity, eDiscovery and data privacy. Nuix customers include major corporations and financial regulators, law enforcement agencies, global corporations, secret service agencies, the United Nations, and all the leading advisory firms and litigation support vendors.

Stuart highlighted that analysts are under increasing pressure to respond to ‘Big Data’ challenges, which are further compounded by a greater and more diverse range of digital devices. Key facts are often spread across multiple evidence sources and investigations are becoming more complex and multidimensional.He concluded that analysts need more efficient workflows, working towards intelligence-driven investigations that harness automation technology to avoid becoming swamped by big data.

The next public seminar is scheduled for mid-September at the Macquarie City Campus, and will feature members of a private sector ‘Red Team’ - a group that simulates attacks on a company's systems to measure how well the organisation's controls would stand up to a real-life adversary. Contact Brett Peppler for more information.

MRes students showcase their projects

The RF2 Conference was a huge success! We would like to congratulate the 78 MRes Year 2 speakers who presented over the four days and did a wonderful job demonstrating the breadth of innovative research happening within our faculty. We would also like to thank Professor Martina Möllering for opening the conference, to all the department MRes Directors and Supervisors, and to everyone who came out to support and engage in thought provoking dialogue.

Additionally, we would like to acknowledge the three award winners:

The two Excellence in Research prizes were awarded to:

Rebekah Stevens, Law
Supervisor: Dr Daniel Ghezelbash
Delivering ‘Valuable’ Justice: Measuring the benefits of not-for-profit (NFP) legal advocacy

Eleanor Quinlan, Sociology
Supervisor: Prof Gabrielle Meagher
Pathways for Graduates into the Not-For-Profit Sector

The one People's Choice prize was awarded to:

Kavya Kalutantiri, Sociology
Supervisor: A/Prof Amanda Wise
Navigating Identity Through Food: A Second Generation Sinhala Australian Diasporic Experience

If you are interested in reviewing the book of abstracts please contact the Arts MRes office (arts.mres@mq.edu.au) for more information, as we have a few printed copies left.

International Law + Summer School Hamburg - Sydney

Ten undergraduate law students from Sydney are currently visiting the University of Hamburg. The visit is part of the pioneer project “International Law Plus”. This new summer school concept is just one of the many projects of the larger trilateral partnership of Macquarie University, University of Hamburg and the Fudan University in Shanghai, which is partly funded by the DAAD Strategic Partnerships and Thematic Networks funding program.

International Law Plus brought Australian and German students together in order to work in pairs on issues in climate change and environmental law, under the patronage of Dr Kirsten Davies and Professor Dr Markus Kotzur. Over a period of five months, starting with a visit of the German students in Sydney, and continuing online, the students developed ideas of how to face today's environmental issues. Besides academic accomplishments, the students mutually learnt about the Australian and German culture and made last but not least new friends on the other side of the globe.

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