Macquarie’s surgical innovation framework recognised as international gold standard

Macquarie’s surgical innovation framework recognised as international gold standard

Macquarie’s surgical innovation framework recognised as international gold standard

The UK’s Royal College of Surgeons has recently adopted guidelines for surgical innovation developed by a Macquarie University team, led by Professor Wendy Rogers.

The College’s new publication Surgical Innovation, New Techniques and Technologies provides guidance for 25,000 UK and international surgeons on developing and implementing innovative surgical procedures to ensure patient safety. The definition of surgical innovation developed by Professor Rogers’ team has been used as a basis for the guidelines.

“This is fantastic recognition of our work on defining surgical innovation developed in the ARC-funded Linkage project On the cutting edge: promoting best practice in surgical innovation,” said Professor Rogers.

“This multi-disciplinary project involved staff from Philosophy, Law and Medicine at Macquarie and included 5 partner organisations. Surgical innovation is difficult to define as it lies on a spectrum between variations of normal practice and research. Innovation is crucial to progress in surgery, but it can be dangerous for patients when their surgeon 'tries something new'.”

One of the major outputs of the research is a simple questionnaire tool designed to identify when a surgical procedure is innovative: the Macquarie Surgical Innovation Identification Tool, or MSIIT. The MSIIT is cited in the guidelines and reproduced in the Appendix, thus drawing attention to it and making it accessible to all practising surgeons in the UK.

“The Royal College of Surgeons developed these guidelines in response to the death of a patient following an innovative procedure, robot-assisted heart valve surgery. Preventing these kinds of tragic events was one of the main motivations for our research,” said Professor Rogers.

“If a procedure is identified as innovative using the MSIIT, this allows supports to be put in place to decrease the risk to the patient.

“We hope that the uptake of our definition and the MSIIT by a prestigious body like the Royal College of Surgeons (UK) will make innovation safer for patients while also supporting surgeons who innovate.”

The MSIIT is now undergoing pilot testing in several Australian hospitals and there is a pilot project in the Netherlands, supported by a DVC-R Discretionary grant.

Back to the top of this page